PPDB June 26, 2017: Health care and more

The report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, which will evaluate the impact of the Senate’s health care bill, could come out as early as today. That CBO score should give us a better idea of exactly how many people might lose insurance, how much premiums might rise for working Americans under this plan, and the impact on those covered by Medicaid.

There are reportedly five GOP holdouts on the bill including staunch ObamaCare opponent Ron Johnson from Wisconsin. (Those of you from Kansas: Sen. Jerry Moran is reportedly “on the fence.”)

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PPDB: Senate Health Care Bill

I’ve been offline a bit this week as I have been in the middle of a pretty exciting and substantial move. I hope to be able to announce more about that soon, but I hope you’ll accept my apology for being out of the loop a bit this week. In the meantime, I wanted to take some time to do a roundup on the issue of health care.

The Senate Republicans finally released the text of the “Better Care Reconciliation Act” — the health care plan that 13 male members have been drafting in secret. I thought I would do a quick rundown in regards to what is being said about this bill, as well as point everyone to resources that spell out the differences between the Senate Bill, the House Bill and ObamaCare.

First of all, here’s the link to the full bill if you want to read the complete version.

The Washington Post and LA Times both have great breakdowns of all three bills and how they might affect your loved ones.

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Health care is not a free market

A few years ago, I ran the Marine Corp Marathon. It was not a brag-worthy performance, but I finished and that’s all I really have to say about it. I’ve checked it off the bucket list and I’ll probably never go that long of a distance without the assistance of a car ever again.

In the weeks after, I developed a pain in my hip. I went to my primary care doctor who couldn’t figure out what was wrong. Concerned I could have torn something, the doctor referred me to a specialist who recommended an MRI.

I had a terrible insurance plan with a ridiculously high deductible compared to my salary. When I called to make the appointment, the receptionist told me I would need to have the payment for the MRI at the time of service.

“How much will that cost?” I asked.

“We don’t know,” she replied.

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